Belcarra

Belcarra

Belcarra, Ireland

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Description

Belcarra is a village on the shore of Indian Arm, a side inlet of Burrard Inlet, and is part of Metro Vancouver. It lies northwest of Port Moody and immediately east of the Deep Cove area of North Vancouver, across the waters of Indian Arm. Isolated by geography on a narrow peninsula, Belcarra is accessible by a single winding paved road or by water. Before incorporation it was commonly known as Belcarra Bay.It is largely a residential bedroom community for Vancouver and its suburbs. Belcarra is the only community in this area that is not growing substantially. Even neighbouring Anmore, another tiny community has grown and changed, but Belcarra has remained a relatively small community. This is a result of its small size, carved out of a major regional park, and zoning only for single family residential homes. With a population of 690 as of 2010, it has the lowest population of any independent settlement in the Vancouver area. Many residents in Belcarra have private docks and boats; even houses that are not on the water are sometimes able to procure a shared dock. Belcarra Regional Park winds its way through the village.HistoryBelcarra was a traditional camping area for the Tsleil-waututh, the First Nations people whose territory it is in. Its beach and exposed westerly view give it a fine outlook and afternoon sun. The site was abandoned sometime between 1858 and 1864 when smallpox ravaged the aboriginal population. The remaining people moved their main permanent village across the inlet. The site at Belcarra was pre-empted early by European settlers, who were involved in an unfortunate murder in 1882. In turn, the land was deeded to the defending solicitor, who named the place Belcarra. A summer cabin was subsequently built. In time more cabins were built, and the local ferry company built a pier, park and campsite, for vacationers. Admiralty Point was a government naval reserve, and was thus saved from development. The area is now a regional park.