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Friday
23
MAR

David Greenhalgh | Kuba Dorabialski

18:00
17:00

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Opening Friday 23 March, 6pm until late.
Exhibition continues until Sunday 8 April.

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David Greenhalgh
The Eyes of the Power Company

The Eyes of the Power Company:
A Berlin Wall beneath your feet
An internet drop, the modem’s reach
a radial fern from a finger click
an ice sheet detaches and reaches Sao Paulo
a man with no arms makes beautiful music
a city is levelled and sanctions soon follow
a brand-new bag designed for your dog
a racist attack at a tram station stop
an exploding phone
an internet tone

The Eyes of the Power Company is a short film made of other people’s films. It is a film about the limits of our understanding of the world and the inadequate tools and vocabulary we possess for knowing how things are: we must make do with what we’ve got, just as the film relies on second-hand footage.

Soundtrack contributions by Daniel Pliner aka PlaneFace (https://www.facebook.com/planeface101).

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Kuba Dorabialski
Seven Revisionists

Kuba Dorabialski’s video installation Seven Revisionists (2018) is the second part of his Invocation Trilogy series of video works. The first of the series was last year’s Floor Dance of Lenin’s Resurrection (2017).

Seven Revisionists continues on from the first instalment, combining themes of political hope and disillusionment, restless myth making and vague, sugary memories of the 20th century socialist project. Shot on the centenary of the October Revolution of 1917, the video takes as its starting point Soviet cinema of the 1970s, distorting it with dance and slapstick.

The titular seven revisionists refer to a photograph of the leaders of the seven Warsaw Pact nations meeting just before the collapse of the Berlin Wall. Speaking a fictional hybrid dialect made up of various Slavic languages, an unnamed narrator recalls intimate memories of each of them (an insincere courtesy, a hostile smatter of gossip, a forgotten flirt in a health spa…). Meanwhile, two young boys cross a vast wilderness in search of a magical, mystical icon that will restore history and deliver us from evil. Finally, in a crescendo of 1970s retro synth sounds, religious incantations and grandiloquent communist phraseology, everything collapses into a single unifying moment of highspeed dance.

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This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.