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Saturday
12
MAY

Boneshaker Book Club: Border

09:00
11:00
Boneshaker Books
Event organized by Boneshaker Books

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The May 12 Boneshaker Book Club selection is "Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe" by Kapka Kassabova. Copies are now in-stock, and are available at a 20% discount for all readers.

"Border shows more starkly than anything else I have read what the border did to the people who lived along it, and how its legacy endures." -Mark Mazower, The Guardian (UK)

The Boneshaker Book Club is free and open to the public, welcoming people with diverse viewpoints and perspectives to join us in conversation. We meet at the bookstore on the second Saturday of every month from 9-11am, and hope you'll join us for this month's club!

**No racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, fatphobia, etc.**

Boneshaker Books is ADA accessible, with no stairs or steps leading into, or in, the store. We have one single-stall, all-gender restroom. Boneshaker is located off the #2 and 67 bus lines, and is a short distance from the Blue Line light rail. Multiple bikeways provide access to the store, and ample bike parking is available. For people driving, there is plenty of street parking.

ABOUT THE BOOK:
In this extraordinary work of narrative reportage, Kapka Kassabova returns to Bulgaria, from where she emigrated as a girl twenty-five years previously, to explore the border it shares with Turkey and Greece. When she was a child, the border zone was rumored to be an easier crossing point into the West than the Berlin Wall, and it swarmed with soldiers and spies. On holidays in the “Red Riviera” on the Black Sea, she remembers playing on the beach only miles from a bristling electrified fence whose barbs pointed inward toward the enemy: the citizens of the totalitarian regime.

Kassabova discovers a place that has been shaped by successive forces of history: the Soviet and Ottoman empires, and, older still, myth and legend. Her exquisite portraits of fire walkers, smugglers, treasure hunters, botanists, and border guards populate the book. There are also the ragged men and women who have walked across Turkey from Syria and Iraq. But there seem to be nonhuman forces at work here too: This densely forested landscape is rich with curative springs and Thracian tombs, and the tug of the ancient world, of circular time and animism, is never far off.

Border is a scintillating, immersive travel narrative that is also a shadow history of the Cold War, a sideways look at the migration crisis troubling Europe, and a deep, witchy descent into interior and exterior geographies.