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Saturday
21
APR

CNME Finale Program

19:30
21:30

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The CNME Finale Program will include the first annual LSU Composer Competition Winners, as well as highlights from the season alongside music by Dinos Constantinides. Concert begins at 7:30 in the School of Music Recital Hall.

Program:

Weekends (2010), Reed Hanna
Wilbert Gilley, clarinet
Marcus Westbrook, bassoon

Sequenza VII (1969), Luciano Berio
Andrea Silverio, oboe

Midnight Fantasy II (1999), Dinos Constantinides

Griffin Campbell, alto sax (soloist)

Melody Wan, flute
Andrea Silverio, oboe
Sam Schreiber, Bb clarinet
Marcus Westbrook, bassoon
Centria Brown, horn
Shane Courville, trumpet
Austin Richardson, trombone
Mark Collins, percussion
Rachel Reese/ Mahakit Lerdcheewanan, violin
Xinyu Yang, violin
Mounir Nessim, viola
Hanna Yeo, cello
Ivan Smetankin, contrabass

Short Intermission

The Seventh Wave (2016)
Austin Franklin

Featuring the Graduate WW Quintet
Melody Wan, flute
Kristin Bundy, oboe
Wilbert Gilley, clarinet
Centria Brown, horn
Marcus Westbrook, bassoon

Coached by Professor Darrel Hale

The Persistence of Memory (2018)
Leigh Anne Robichaux – world premiere

Kelvin Jones, conductor

Melody Wan, flute
Kristin Bundy, oboe
Wilbert Gilley, clarinet
Marcus Westbrook, bassoon
Matt Huff, bassoon
Taylor Assad, alto sax
Centria Brown, horn
Shane Courville, trumpet
Austin Richardson, trombone
Allen Carpenter, tuba
Rachel Reese/Mahakit Lerdcheewanan, violin
Xinyu Yang, violin
Mounir Nessim, viola
Hanna Yeo, cello
Ivan Smetankin, countrabass

Bios and Notes:
The music of Greek born composer Dinos Constantinides (Boyd Professor of Composition) has been performed throughout the world. He is the recipient of many grants, commissions and awards, including first prizes in the 1981 Brooklyn College International Chamber Competition, the 1985 First Midwest Chamber Opera Conference, and the 1997 Delius composition Contest Grand Prize. He also received the 1985 American New Music consortium Distinguished Service Award, the 1989 Glen Award of l’Ensemble of New York, several Meet the Composer grants and numerous ASCAP Standard Awards. In 1994 he was honored with a Distinguished Teacher White House commission on Presidential Scholars. He is presently Boyd Professor, the highest academic rank at Louisiana State University, head of the Composition area, and Music Director of the Louisiana Sinfonietta.

Midnight Fantasy II is based on a cluster of half steps. This is evident at the very beginning of the work, and octave displacements later create melodic figures of a lyrical nature. In fact, this cluster was created from the beginning of an old, evocative Nat King Cole song. The interplay of tonal and atonal elements achieves changes of mood and affects the overall structure of the piece. Fantasy begins with a cadenza of the solo instrument leading to a cluster of three notes in the orchestra. Numerous elaborations of this three-note figure lead to a nightingale’s song. Occasionally fast descending sonorities interrupt the tranquil mood of the music. A dramatic middle section embellished by short, fast passages brings the music back to the opening three-note cluster. A highly contrapuntal section builds up to some very loud sonorities echoed by very soft clusters. The nightingale’s song appears again as an epilogue to the entire piece. The composition ends with some haunting sonorities enhanced by antique cymbals and triangles. Midnight Fantasy II was completed in 1989 and was revised in its present version in 2001. This composition is an outgrowth of the work Midnight Song for soprano and chamber orchestra.
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Bayhi Alumni Professor and Distinguished Professor of Saxophone Griffin Campbell has performed throughout the US and in South America, Europe, and Asia, including performances at meetings of the World Saxophone Congress, NASA, SCI, SEAMUS, and ICMC. Recordings can be found on the Capstone, Cat Crisis, Centaur, EMF, Innova, SEAMUS, Vestige, and WorldWinds labels. He has conducted seminars in saxophone performance at universities, conservatories, and conferences throughout the United States and in Greece, Bolivia, Brazil, Italy, Argentina, and China. His musical explorations include nearly every style and genre. Campbell is president of the North American Saxophone Alliance and has been teaching at LSU since 1984. He is a Vandoren and Selmer Artist.
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Austin Franklin graduated from Lamar University with a bachelor's degree in music composition, where he studied with Dr. Nick Rissman. While he was there, he tutored music theory and ear training. Austin is now completing his master's in music composition at LSU, where he is a Graduate Assistant for Boyd Professor Dr. Dinos Constantinides.

Austin has several pieces for percussion published through C-Alan Publications, and he is regularly performed throughout the United States.

His piece for woodwind quintet, The Seventh Wave was recently commissioned for the Sound and Sight Art Collaboration in Beaumont, Texas, which will take place on Nov. 4.

The popular myth known as The Seventh Wave claims that ocean waves tend to form into individual groups of seven, with the seventh being the biggest of the group. The final wave has been said to be so big that it can capsize a ship at sea, or return a sailor who has fallen overboard back to his ship. This myth, however largely proven to be false, does prove that regularities in waves can occur if weather conditions are favorable.

The formal plan of the piece is meant to represent a single composite group of waves, using texture, tempo, and thematic disposition to delineate each wave. The piece was completed in 2016, and revised in 2018. It has since been selected for the Sound/Sight Art Collaboration, and was the winner of the First Annual LSU Composition Competition.
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Leigh Anne Robichaux is an undergraduate composition major at LSU. She has studied under Prof. Dinos Constantinides and is a current student of Dr. Mara Gibson. Her music is inspired by visual art, poetry, and colors, invoking the visual from an entirely different sense. She is a winner of the first annual Constantinides New Music Ensemble Competition, for her chamber orchestra piece, “The Persistence of Memory,” inspired by the famous “melting clock” painting of Salvador Dalí. As a violinist, she enjoys writing for strings but also for piano and electronics. She is currently involved in two collaborations, writing for poetry: one with a vocalist, and another, “Joyful Noise,” with choreographers and dancers.

The Persistence of Memory was inspired by the famous “melting clock” painting by Salvador Dalí. It explores the madness of the subconscious mind and the dream state and the perception of time. The map of the composition is a circular progression resembling a clock that starts at the top of the painting, the flat waters creating a feeling of peace, down into the barren desert named “void of the subconscious,” into the “scherzo” of the melting clocks, and back to a new, enlightened sense of peace. There are nine sections in total, and each section represents a pie piece of the clock.