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Friday
13
APR

Japanese Animation x 2: Mary and the Witch's Flower & Mind Game

21:30
23:15
Cornell Cinema
Event organized by Cornell Cinema

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Cornell Cinema presents two Japanese animations this April, one from Academy Award-nominated director Hiromasa Yonebayashi (When Marnie Was There) and the other from cult anime director Masaaki Yuasa. Mary and the Witch’s Flower is the first release from Studio Ponoc following Yonebayashi’s departure from legendary animation outfit Studio Ghibli. Mind Game is receiving its first-ever American theatrical distribution, and has been hailed as one of the greatest anime films ever made.

MARY AND THE WITCH'S FLOWER
Friday, April 13 at 9:30 - shown in Japanese language
Saturday, April 14 at 7pm - shown in English language
The director of When Marnie was There and The Secret World of Arrietty has created a tale of childhood wonder, filled with magical flowers, flying broomsticks and closely kept secrets. “The animators invoke worlds upon worlds in Mary and the Witch’s Flower: the green woods and mist-filled forests of England [are] rendered in swooning evocative watercolors.” (RogerEbert.com) Recommended for ages 8+.
Watch a trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fv-75_4JhMI


MIND GAME
Friday, April 20 at 9:45
Saturday, April 21 at 9:30
Both shows in Japanese language.
The directorial debut of Masaaki Yuasa (Kaiba, The Tatami Galaxy), Mind Game is an anime cult classic filled to the brim with fight scenes, supernatural beings, and MacGyver-esque ingenuity. Mind Game follows Nishi (Kōji Imada) who, largely through sheer unluckiness, must face murderous yakuza, the afterlife, and a giant whale in one eventful day. The movie is also distinct from other anime films as Yuasa and his animators use a smorgasbord of animations styles to tell their oddball story. “Out-of-context flashbacks and flash-forwards were a staple of late-’60s New Wave filmmaking, but, save for some early Bakshi fare, animated features have rarely strayed from strictly linear through lines.” (Variety)
Watch a trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fmmCsyK1dY