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Thursday
05
APR

Art and Science Perspectives on Climate Change

16:00
18:00
The Arts at Rowan
Event organized by The Arts at Rowan

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ART AND SCIENCE PERSPECTIVES ON CLIMATE CHANGE
THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 4:00 - 6:00 PM
Chamberlain Student Center/Eynon Ballroom

This event is free and open to the public. More on this event can be found here: https://sites.rowan.edu/artgallery/exhibitions/climate-change-panel.html

In conjunction with the exhibition Vast and Vanishing, and in partnership with the School of Earth and Environment, this panel brings together artists and scientists to talk about how these two disciplines intersect to raise awareness of the impacts of climate change.

DIANE BURKO, KEYNOTE AND PRESENTING ARTIST
Diane Burko has also been a visiting professor or lecturer at varied institutions including at Princeton University, Arizona State University and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She has been invited to speak at conferences such as the Geological Society of America, the American Geophysical Union, The Atlantic Council, the International Cryosphere Conference in Wellington NZ and Arctic Circle Assembly Conference in Reykjavik. There have been more than 40 solo exhibitions and over 100 painting and photography exhibitions of Burko’s work in galleries and museums throughout the country. Burko is represented in numerous collections including the Art Institute of Chicago; Denver Art Museum; the Hood Museum of Art, NH; the James A. Michener Art Museum, PA; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; The Philadelphia Museum of Art; The Tucson Museum of Art, AZ; the National Academy of the Sciences, Washington D. C; the Woodmere Art Museum and the Zimmerli Art Museum, New Brunswick, NJ.

KENNETH LACOVARA, MODERATOR, DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENT
Dr. Kenneth Lacovara has unearthed some of the largest dinosaurs ever to walk our planet, including the super-massive Dreadnoughtus, which at 65 tons weighs more than seven T. rex. Lacovara applies cutting edge technology to the study of dinosaurs. By using 3D imaging, 3D printing, robotics, and medical modeling techniques, his work is helping to shift our perspective of giant herbivorous dinosaurs from their historic portrayal as hapless lumbering prey to that of fearsome, hulking, hyper-efficient eating machines that deserve our awe and respect. Lacovara’s TED Talk, “Hunting for dinosaurs showed me our place in the Universe,” was among the Top 10 TED Talks of 2016. He has appeared in numerous television documentaries and his discoveries have landed him three times in Discover magazine’s 100 Top Science Stories of the year and in Time’s Top Stories of 2014. Lacovara was named by Men’s Journal as one of “The Next Generation of Explorers” and he is an elected fellow of the prestigious Explorers Club in New York. Dr. Lacovara holds a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Delaware. At Rowan University he is the founding Dean of the School of Earth & Environment and Director of the Jean & Ric Edelman Fossil Park.

KATE MARVEL, RESEARCH SCIENTIST AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY AND NASA GODWARD INSTITUTE OF SPACE STUDIES
Dr. Kate Marvel is a research scientist at Columbia University and the NASA Goddard Institute of Space Studies. She uses computer models and satellite observations to monitor and explain the changes happening around us. Her scientific work has shown that human activities are already affecting global rainfall and cloud patterns. Her essays have appeared in Nautilus Magazine, Scientific American, and On Being. Marvel is an associate research scientist at both the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, which is affiliated with the Columbia Earth Institute, and Columbia Engineering School, where she is a member of the Department of Applied Physics and Mathematics. She writes scientific papers with titles like “Implications for Climate Sensitivity from the Response to Individual Forcings.” Her TED Talk, filmed in April, “Can Clouds Buy Us More Time to Solve Climate Change?” has been viewed over one million times. In 2015, Marvel provided the underlying data for Bloomberg.com’s best performing story of that year, a data visualization titled “What’s Really Warming the World?”

LUKE TRUSEL, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY
Dr. Luke Trusel is an Assistant Professor of Geology at Rowan University. His research investigates melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets through the analysis of satellite observations, ice cores, and climate models. He is broadly interested in the impacts of climate change across Earth’s polar regions, and how changes at the poles are linked to the broader Earth system. Prior to joining the faculty at Rowan, Dr. Trusel was a postdoctoral scholar in Geology & Geophysics at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and he received a PhD in Geography in 2014 from Clark University where he was a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellow.